Cash Transfer Workshop for Businesses Postponed to 29 August 2018, Zero carbon emission can be achieved with solid foundation: FCEF and Other News.

Cash Transfer Workshop for Businesses Postponed to 29 August 2018

The Cash Transfer Workshop organize by Oxfam in Vanuatu, in partnership with the Vanuatu Business Resilience committee (VBRC), is postponed to 29 August 2018 at Ramada Hotel from 8am – 12pm, with lunch provided.

 More information about the Cash Transfer workshop will be provided to businesses in the next few days. 

Your business operates in the following sectors: 

Financial/Cash Delivery whom will be

the Banking Institutions, Money transfer Operators and Mobile services Providers and

Supply-side Goods and Services whom will be the Transport and Logistics Providers, Hardware and Agriculture Suppliers and Wholesale and Retail Suppliers for Food/Grocery. 

You are invited to confirm your attendance.

Business will be consulted on topics such as financial delivery channels, market presence and availability of supply-side services critical for the delivery of humanitarian assistance in the form of cash or vouchers. 

For businesses who wish to attend the Cash Transfer workshop, you can confirm your attendance by Tuesday 28 August 2018 by email to [email protected] or contact VCCI office on 27543 / 7123967.

For more information on the Cash Transfer workshop, you can contact Mrs Sandra Hart, Pacific Cash & Livelihoods Advisor, Oxfam, Vanuatu, by email [email protected] or phone 534 7911.

 

Zero carbon emission can be achieved with solid foundation: FCEF

Vilimaina Naqelevuki, Fiji Times, 26 July 2018

As Pacific men and women, we know what we’re up against, we’ve all endured the devastating impacts of cyclones, rising seas and other climate impacts.

This was stressed by the Attorney General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum during the Global Employers Climate Action Forum organised by the Fiji Commerce and Employers Federation on 25 July 2018 at the Holiday Inn, Suva.

He said the eyes of the world were on the Pacific as the Global Employers Climate Action Forum began; and that “government, businesses and citizens are looking to us because we our people and our economies are on the front lines of climate change”.

FCEF chief executive Nesbitt Hazelman said the forum focused “on how we can achieve net zero carbon emissions and build resilience”.

“As we mentioned from the start, we can only achieve this if there is a solid foundation and partnership between the Government, us the private sector, the development partners, civil society organisation and the communities,” Mr Hazelman said.

He said the outcomes of the forum laid the pathway for the private sector to accelerate climate action and also to achieve the targets set for the 2030 agenda for sustainable development.

The Vanuatu Chamber of Commerce and Industry was represented at the Global Employers Climate Action Forum in Suva, Fiji, by Mr Shaun Gilchrist, CEO of Azure Pure Water, who is the Manufacturing Councillor of VCCI.

 

Succeeding in tourism

A series of practical articles by Chris Elphick, Breadfruit Consulting, aimed at tourism SMEs.

Article one – an introduction

Over the next few weeks I will focus on the challenges and opportunities facing small businesses working in the tourism industry.

Across the Pacific tourism has been identified as a major industry for economic development and resources are provided by a wide range of organisations. This focus on tourism obviously provides enormous opportunities to rural and urban communities alike but will it be possible for everyone to access those opportunities?  Will there be an equal playing field? Will tourism reap the rewards for small rural businesses in remote parts of the Pacific? How will small tourism businesses be able to compete with their larger and probably better resourced neighbours? How will locally run tourism businesses be able to compete with expat run and resourced operations?

During this series I will be exploring what tourists want and how this matches up to what we provide; how we meet and exceed expectations and send tourists home determined to come back bringing all their friends; how the Pacific can create a  reputation for exceptional and consistently high service; how we can develop a vibrant tourism industry without damaging our local cultures; how tourism can economically benefit rural areas; how tourism can provide jobs and careers for our young people; what needs to happen to support a sustainable local tourism industry; what are we really selling to visitors and how we make sure they take home unforgettable memories.

We are lucky in the Pacific to live in some of the most beautiful countries in the world – countries that people do want to visit and experience.  Many visitors want to understand our culture, meet local people, get a taste of Pacific life.  They want to experience the things that the Pacific offers that are not available elsewhere

Tourism is certainly an industry full of opportunities.  This short series of articles looks at how small tourism businesses can make the most of these opportunities and turn them to their advantage.  Tourists will not just turn up!  And they certainly will not return if they do not have the experience of a lifetime!

A few months go I ran a workshop for local tourism providers – of the 40 people present only two had ever been tourists and travelled outside their country. 38 people were trying to deliver products and services to people they knew nothing about – they had been encouraged by a range of organisations to develop small scale accommodation or tours but had received little or no realistic help or guidance on how best to do this.

I hope this series will help small scale tourism operators to become more effective and profitable and therefore develop a sustainable industry offering jobs and careers to local people while providing stunning experiences to visitors from all over the world.  Tourism has the potential to transform the economy of Pacific countries, but it also has the potential to deepen the divide between the haves and the have nots.  No Pacific country can afford for this to happen.

Tourism is not an easy industry to succeed in. Products and services have to live up to expectations; visitors have to come; visitors have to be looked after; problems have to be solved before they get out of hand.  It is essentially a people industry where people from different cultures come into close contact with each other for short periods of time.  Social media means that people can broadcast their experiences to the world almost immediately after they have had them – good and bad!

If you have any tourism issues you would like me to cover during this series, please contact me.

Coming next, what do tourists want and how do we make sure they get what they want? 

Chris Elphick is Partner in Breadfruit Consulting, supporting the development of a range of businesses and organisations in Melanesia and other parts of the Pacific.  He is an experienced trainer, coach and business mentor and has years of experience of working with Small & Medium Enterprises.  He and his partner Hazel Kirkham live in Vanuatu and are involved with tourism operators snd their businesses in several Pacific countries.

Breadfruit Consulting have partnered with Fiji Entrepreneur to develop mentoring services for new and young entrepreneurs.

If you have an issue or query related to this article, please contact Chris at [email protected] or text to +6785500556.

 

Succeeding in tourism

A series of practical articles by Chris Elphick, Breadfruit Consulting, aimed at tourism SMEs.

Article twounderstanding our visitors

Over the next few weeks I will focus on the challenges and opportunities facing small businesses working in the tourism industry.

Across the Pacific tourism has been identified as a major industry for economic development and resources are provided by a wide range of organisations. This focus on tourism obviously provides enormous opportunities to rural and urban communities alike but will it be possible for everyone to access those opportunities?  Will there be an equal playing field? Will tourism reap the rewards for small rural businesses in remote parts of the Pacific? How will small tourism businesses be able to compete with their larger and probably better resourced neighbours? How will locally run tourism businesses be able to compete with expat run and resourced operations?

Understanding who tourists are, what they want from us and making sure they get what they want, and more, is vital to any successful tourism business.  The challenge for many small operators in the Pacific is the lack of tourism experience where we may not have travelled outside of our own area let alone our own country.

If possible going on a short break to another country to experience being a tourist for a few days is ideal.  This way you will get to experience first-hand what some of the tourists who visit you do.

First time visitors to the Pacific who have only information from friends or the web to go on may well have unrealistic expectations.  They may try to do too much in too short a time and get disappointed; they may not think that it rains here; they may not be used to power going off at night or water shortages.  When people get disappointed they get upset and often angry and lose any sense of proportion.

Number one essential is to make sure that when you meet your visitors for the first time blow them away with your interest in them. Ask them questions; give them a fresh coconut and some nice fresh local fruit; if they are hungry feed them even if the kitchen is closed! If you know what nationality they are try and learn a couple of simple greetings in their language; manage peoples’ expectations from the beginning by giving them good information; think ahead and anticipate anything that could go wrong and, above all, focus on the friendliness and beauty of the Pacific.

We must train our staff to be problem solvers, not problem avoiders!  No-one wants to hear ‘The boss is not here today’! if someone has a problem, no matter how small, then it has to be solved to the benefit of the visitor immediately.  It doesn’t matter if it is not a problem for the business or individual member of staff.

Anyone in the tourism business takes on a duty of care for visitors – look after them; treat them as special guests; think ahead and anticipate any concerns they might have; thank them for coming and for spending their money with you.  Try and put yourself in their shoes – imagine you are visiting a city in India for the first time. How might you feel? You are likely to be nervous, apprehensive, maybe a little frightened, curious – you will need a friend.

If you are running a small tourism business, or even a larger one, go out of your way to make friends with the visitors – stop what you are doing and focus on them – after all they pay your bills!

Finally, it is likely that most people who have travelled all the way to the Pacific to stay on a secluded island in a small resort are looking for an experience of a lifetime – make sure you give it to them!!  Your accommodation may not be as comfortable or as large as some in other parts of the world – but make it authentic and genuine.  Serve local food with pride.  Meet needs of visitors before they become a problem.  Fill their days with surprises.

If you have any tourism issues you would like me to cover during this series, please contact me.

Coming next, creating a reputation in the Pacific for exceptional and consistently high service. 

Chris Elphick is Partner in Breadfruit Consulting, supporting the development of a range of businesses and organisations in Melanesia and other parts of the Pacific.  He is an experienced trainer, coach and business mentor and has years of experience of working with Small & Medium Enterprises.  He and his partner Hazel Kirkham live in Vanuatu and are involved with tourism operators and their businesses in several Pacific countries.

Breadfruit Consulting have partnered with Fiji Entrepreneur to develop mentoring services for new and young entrepreneurs.

If you have an issue or query related to this article, please contact Chris at [email protected] or text to +6785500556.